Tips for Interviewing With a Recruiter

March 19th, 2019


In any sports league, there’s preseason and then there are the games that matter. The players tend to go through the motions on the preseason schedule, saving themselves for the games that actually count in the standings.

People often treat an interview with a recruiter like a preseason game. They assume that since the recruiter gets paid to find you a job, the meeting with them becomes a perfunctory obligation, just another step in the process for signing up with the staffing agency.

But an interview with a recruiter provides an important opportunity. It helps you direct the course of future placements, giving you a chance to lay out your preferences and your pet peeves.

For the recruiter, the interview offers an occasion to get to know you. They can also provide meaningful feedback that can help with your long-term career development.

A meeting with a recruiter can represent an important step in landing a meaningful position with a quality company. The recruiter’s goal is to put you in a position where you can leverage your skills and advance your career. The interview is your chance to help them do it.

Don’t Think, “It’s Just a Recruiter”

Treat the meeting like it’s an interview with an employer. Impressing your recruiter will help your cause. It will increase their confidence and allow them to put you up for plum assignments.

Making the right impression involves simple things like dressing appropriately and putting on your interview “game face.” Show the recruiter how you’ll present yourself in the workplace. It gives them a better reading on you and builds a strong foundation for a symbiotic professional relationship.

An interview with a recruiter also represents good practice. The meeting has less inherent pressure than appearing before a prospective employer, giving you kind of a “dress rehearsal” for the more intense interviews you’ll have to face.

Be Prepared

To get the most out of your meeting with the recruiter, do as much homework as possible. Craft questions you’d like to ask and anticipate the kinds of information the recruiter will want.

This will lead to a more meaningful conversation. The recruiter will get a fuller picture of your goals and your skill level. And you’ll have a deeper understanding of the process and what you can do to facilitate a placement.

Think About Your Long-Term Objectives

Your obvious goal when meeting with a recruiter is to find a job. You might even be at the point where your goal is to find ANY job. But when talking to your recruiter, have some longer-term goals in mind as well.

A recruiter can help facilitate your general career development. By sharing your extended aspirations, you can steer the process toward a more meaningful placement.

Understand the Recruiter’s Goals

Your recruiter has dreams too. Their plans to retire in Bermuda someday don’t really play a role here but understanding their professional motivations can help develop a more mutually beneficial relationship.

With that in mind, ask questions. Find out how the recruiter makes money and what you can do to make their jobs easier. By figuring out how to help them, you facilitate their ability to help you.

Working with a first-rate recruiter makes the process easy. The highly trained professionals at SmartTalent will make you feel at ease and lead you down the path to career fulfillment.

Contact SmartTalent today to find out more.

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The Right Way to Follow Up

March 12th, 2019


You thought the worst part was over. You sweated through the interview, overcoming the social and professional pressure of selling yourself to strangers (and you did a pretty good job too, in your humble opinion).

But something worse is on the way: the wait. Once the interview ends, you’re left in limbo as the powers that be make their final hiring decision.

What can you do now? Not much. The decision is out of your hands at this point. But you should follow up on your interview, in order to stay informed about the decision-making process and to build relationships. However, these efforts can easily slide into the “stalking zone,” actually hurting your chances of getting the job in question.

Don’t let that happen to you. Here are the key steps to following up the right way:

Say “Thanks”

Sending a “thank-you” email provides an excellent opportunity to establish contact directly with decision makers.

When writing your “thank you,” keep it short. Try to include something specific from the interview to make it personal. But don’t try too hard to be funny or overly friendly. The tone should remain professional.

Be Cool, but Not Casual

Tone is a key consideration for all your post-interview communications.

First, take a cue from the responses you get. If they get chatty, feel free to get a little chatty. But let them take the lead. Second, at all costs, don’t slip into desperation. Get pushy or defensive (or combative) and you’ve probably sunk your chances.

Give Them Time

Be patient. Corporate gears churn slowly sometimes. Multiple people have to be consulted, permissions have to be granted. If someone’s on vacation or gets busy on an emergency elsewhere, everything can get delayed.

Stay calm. If you start barraging your interviewers with questions, you won’t help your cause.

Check in Politely

While keeping in mind the hiring process might take some time, it’s acceptable to check in now and then. You want to politely find out if a timeline for a decision has been set.

You might also get in contact with your interviewer if your circumstances change. If you get another job offer, for instance, let them know. It likely won’t matter, but you want to give them the chance to make a counteroffer if they’re really interested.

Stay Positive

No matter how long they keep you waiting, no matter how terse their communication gets, don’t turn negative. That holds even if they turn you down. Don’t take rejection as an excuse to send an “I never wanted your stupid job anyway” email.

Even if this position goes to someone else, another job could open up at the same company at some point in the future. You want to keep all doors open. So, stay upbeat and polite.

Build a Relationship

If the company goes with someone else for the position, it’s certainly disappointing. But that’s not necessarily the end of the process.

Think of the post-interview process in the same vein as networking. Do what you can to maintain a relationship. Ask if you can make a connection on LinkedIn. Check in from time to time to see if any new positions have opened up. Also, offer your services for contract work. You never know what opportunities will materialize in the future.

Finding a job is filled with tense and aggravating waiting spells. Partnering with a recruiter can make the transition more tenable. A top staffing firm, like SmartTalent, will place you with the best positions, keeping your career moving forward.

Contact SmartTalent today to find out more.

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How to Improve Your Relationship With Your Boss

March 5th, 2019


Developing a real friendship with your boss will always seem a little fraught. Too many complications (like them being able to tell you what to do) will prevent a mutual, balanced relationship.

Still, building a connection with your manager can have many long-term career benefits. Even if your relationship remains strictly professional (you never talk about anything other TPS reports and output targets), a bond of mutual trust and respect can create opportunities for you both in the near term and well after one of you have left the company.

With that in mind, find ways to build a relationship with your boss. A personal connection will open the door for more open communications and a more pleasant set of interactions.

Plus, you’ll be better positioned for plum assignments and possible promotions down the road. A strong connection now also improves your ability to get a recommendation down the road, when you’ll need your current manager as a reference.

Here are a few steps you can take to improve your relationship with your boss:

Learn Their Goals

Your boss may do things that don’t always make any sense to you. But remember: Those decisions make sense to them. Find out why.

Your boss has a set of goals they’re trying to accomplish. You might not appreciate all the factors and crosscurrents that go into the decision-making process. By discovering your boss’s goals and their thought process, you’ll have a better understanding of the action plan when it comes.

You can also learn to anticipate decisions and position yourself as a go-to employee.

Show Loyalty

Loyalty is complicated. Show too much of it without getting any in return, and you’re a sucker. But if you show too little, you’ll have a hard time building any sort of meaningful relationship.

It’s usually better to err on the side of too much loyalty than too little (though you should always maintain a rational cynicism about office politics). Have your boss’s back wherever possible. You want to avoid becoming the office today, but showing loyalty will likely earn you some in return.

Make Yourself Useful

As we’ve discussed, your boss has goals they’re trying to accomplish. The more you can help in that program, the better your boss’s opinion of you will be.

Plug yourself into your boss’s thought process. Find areas where they need help and figure out how to fit in. Volunteer for assignments and learn new skills if needed. You’ll impress your manager and build out your experience and skill set at the same time.

Get Feedback

Hearing from your boss can be a stomach-turning experience. No one wants to get criticized. But to build a strong relationship with your boss (and get better at your job), you’ll have to go against your instinct to avoid critique

Ask for feedback. The information you receive will help you improve, making you a better employee. Meanwhile, the sheer act of requesting an evaluation will get you face time with your boss, helping to put you on their radar in a positive way.

Ask for Advice

Another reason for a one-to-one interaction with boss: ask for general advice. It gives you an excuse for a conversation, in a way that butters them up a bit.

Also, the advice might even be good. Your boss (presumably) has more experience than you and works in an industry that interests you. They have stories to share and wisdom to impart.

Finding a position where you can learn from your bosses and grow as an individual provides a solid foundation for long-term career growth. SmartTalent can help you find those positions. Contact them today to find out more.

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Do You Know Your 5-Year Plan?

February 19th, 2019


Five years ago, you were staring blankly at the front wall of your cubicle, lamenting another day sacrificed to a go-nowhere dead-end job. Now? Still staring blankly at the front wall of your cubicle, lamenting … well, you get the point.

The problem? Five years ago, you didn’t make a plan to energize your career. Without a plan, one day rolls into the next, days turn into weeks, weeks into months, months into years.

To make progress, you need a plan.

Even if your job isn’t an existential nightmare, a five-year plan can help you maximize your potential. Here are a few tips on how to best chart out your next half-decade to reach your optimal career:

Picture the Future

It may sound like a granola, shaman-in-desert-induced exercise, but the first step to plotting your five-year plan involves a little vision. You have to imagine where you want to be.

You also have to look beyond the five-year horizon. Careers are long – decades long. As soon as you finish this five-year journey, it will be time to plan another one.

Ask yourself: What’s my ultimate goal? Do you want to maximize income? Job satisfaction? Flexibility? Retirement prospects?

Figure out your ideal long-term destination, and then use the five-year plan as a roadmap to get there.

Research

Once you set a career destination, you need to figure out the best way to get there. That requires research. Find out what training you’ll need for the career you want and what steps you have to take to achieve your goals.

Interested in a high-salary career? Look up what professions have the best compensation prospects. Want to maximize job security? Find out what skills are likely to be in demand far in the future.

Break It Down

A five-year plan shouldn’t consist of the words “become CEO” scrawled on a cocktail napkin. Getting to your dream will require accomplishing a series of small, distinct steps.

Think of it like instructions for putting together furniture you bought on the internet. Two-hundred otherwise simple moves – a few screws here, a few dowels there – turns a pile of parts into a chest of drawers. Same with your career. Split the journey into reasonable chunks, so you can progress on a day-to-day basis.

Leave Wiggle Room

As you plan for the future, don’t forget goals outside of work. You have family, significant others and children to spend time with (and even if you don’t have all of those now, you easily could have them in five years).

Looking far into the future, it’s easy to focus too intently on limited goals. But life is a messy, sprawling adventure. Don’t become so narrow-minded you eliminate all ability to improvise and react.

Another way to achieve your long-term goals? Finding a good partner. Teaming with an industry-leading staffing firm will help you plan and obtain your five-year objectives.

SmartTalent can put you in the best situation to leverage your skills and determine your future. Contact them today to find out more.

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What to Do If You Don’t Feel Useful

February 12th, 2019


You feel like the company is moving on without you. You see exciting new projects coming up, but other teams get the lion’s share of the work. Opportunities that might become fast-tracks to promotions and recognition don’t even come on your radar anymore.

In short, you feel useless.

But you can’t just sit on the sidelines waiting for someone to tap you on your shoulder. You need to seek out the opportunities. You need to make yourself useful.

Talk to Your Boss

Your boss might not know you want more action. They might worry about overburdening you and have purposely held back on issuing you new assignments.

Your manager also might not be aware of all your abilities. They don’t walk around with a copy of your resume cued up on their phone. You do your job and you do it well – at this point, that’s all they really know about your skill set.

Schedule some time to talk to your boss about the situation. Let them know you are looking for higher-level assignments. And remind them about the other qualifications you have that you’re currently not getting a chance to leverage on the company’s behalf.

Find Something New to Work On

You can’t always wait for your boss to notice you. They’re busy running the team and working to achieve their own goals. Your ambitions might get lost in the shuffle.

So, look for ways to create your own opportunity.

Seek out the projects you’d like to work on and ask to be assigned. Or develop projects of your own. Find situations that need addressing and write up a formal proposal on how to fix them.

At first, these attempts might not go anywhere. But your boss may start to see you in a new light. Once they recognize your ability and ambition, they might become more open to your suggestions. At some point in the future, they may grant one of your requests.

Learn a New Skill

Perhaps there’s a reason you’ve been left out of your company’s more interesting endeavors. Investigate whether you have a gap in your skill set that is holding you back.

If you discover you have a hole in your training, take steps to fill the inadequacy. Ask your boss if there are competencies you can add that will make you eligible for more interesting assignments. You can pursue the necessary training to bring yourself up to date.

Help Other Departments

If you can’t get the engagement you want within your current team, look for opportunities elsewhere in the company. In other words, if the breakout chances aren’t coming to you, go to the breakout chances.

Find out what departments get the most opportunities and look to transfer there. You may have to start at the bottom of the pecking order on a new team. But, eventually, you’ll be in line for the more interesting assignments.

Feeling engaged and useful makes for a more rewarding work experience. Teaming with a staffing firm can help you find a perfect position to utilize your skills. Contact SmartTalent today to find out how they can steer you to the ideal situation.

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What to Do When You Love Your Job, but Not the People

February 5th, 2019


Your workweek probably breaks down a lot like this: Most of your time spent at work, with some small blocks of the day reserved for grooming, meals, getting to and from the office, and maybe a couple of sleepy hours in the evening for Netflix, Facebook and family. The weekends free up a little more personal time, but in general, you spend a good chunk of your waking hours with your co-workers. If you don’t like them, it can be a real bummer.

In a dreary, dead-end position, the fact you don’t like your co-workers just puts another log on an already raging fire. You’re probably on your way out anyway.

However, in a position where you’re otherwise satisfied, a bad relationship with those around you can make everything feel worse.

Yet a rocky relationship with your office mates doesn’t mean you have to abandon a position you love. Here are four things to keep in mind when dealing with a touchy personal situation at work:

Is It Me?

If you don’t like anyone at your company, there’s a clear existential question you need to ask: Is it them, or is it me?

Before disrupting your work life to fix a cultural problem you’ve preemptively blamed on everyone else, do a personal inventory. Check if you bring some negative energy to the situation.

Learn to Get Along

Not every personality mismatch has a culprit. That is to say, the situation might not be anyone’s fault

Look to bridge the gap. If you get to know your coworkers better, you can minimize any personality issues. Familiarity and understanding can sand down a lot of sharp edges.

Organize some get-togethers outside of work. A little time at happy hour might solve the problem completely.

Overcome Your Co-Workers

Some gaps can’t be bridged. Maybe your co-workers don’t want to make a connection. Maybe your attempts to build a relationship fizzled. Whatever the reason, you tried to get along, but nothing has changed.

You’re going to have to be the bigger person. Find ways to accept the situation and do what you can to keep things professional.

If a dispute develops, don’t escalate. Stay calm and professional, even if your co-workers are purposely pushing your buttons.

If it gets too bad, you can look for ways to avoid the worst people in the office. Ask to transfer to another team. Work some flex hours so your schedules don’t match up. Physically move your workspace.

Don’t Let It Ruin the Job

Ultimately, your work life is about the work. If you have an engaging, interesting, inspiring position that fits into your long-term career plans, that’s an enviable situation. Don’t let the other people bring you down. Put your head down and focus on the work.

A great job is one thing. A great company is something more. By partnering with a top-flight staffing firm, like SmartTalent, you can find opportunities that include warm, encouraging cultures.

Contact SmartTalent today to find out more.

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Addressing Gaps in Your Work History

January 30th, 2019


During an interview, you need to navigate tough questions like a professional. Speaking to your strengths, answering scenario questions, and discussing conflict-management styles all help you prove your candidacy. But addressing gaps in your work history can be challenging. Job seekers know this can often be a “red flag” for employers, but if you follow our short guide, you’ll be able to talk through it honestly and impress a recruiter. Here’s how you explain the blank areas of your work history:

1.   Honesty Is the Best Policy

Be straightforward with your interviewer. If they ask a question like: “We don’t see anything listed for 2015, can you talk about that?” here’s your plan. Take a deep breath and remember that having a lull in employment doesn’t make you less qualified for a position. Your reason for being without a job for a stretch is probably a good one. Talk it through and be honest about your situation if your work history gap was due to:

  • Being laid-off
  • Poor fit
  • Unhealthy working conditions or toxic company culture
  • Education-based (you were an active student or just graduated from a course of study)
  • Taking time off to raise a family

If things were a little more complicated, for example, you had urgent personal issues to attend to that required you to leave your job, leave it at that. Your potential employer doesn’t need the dirty details of your family’s transitions or challenges.

2.   Discuss Your Growth

A small pivot can be handy so the recruiter doesn’t focus too much on how long you were out of work and why. It’s great to be able to discuss the constructive things you were able to do during this time. If you have a gap in your work history on your resume, discuss the skills and abilities you worked on. If you took on freelance work, volunteered long-term, started online courses or began learning a new language, talk about it with your interviewer. This shows you’re a self-starter with initiative, and employers always look for a candidate that can develop their skills independently.

3.   Prove Your Performance

If you were terminated from a previous job which led to a spell of unemployment, this is where you need to impress. Any specific information you can give about your excellent productivity on the job will assist you in making your case. It may be helpful to bring a particularly successful report or be able to provide web links to successful projects you worked on. Hard evidence can help your potential employer prove to the team you are an asset.

Ready to find the perfect position for your qualifications? Try SmartTalent, a top Washington staffing agency that offers professional guidance and premium listings to help you further your career on your schedule.

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What to Do When Your Boss Doesn’t Seem Invested in You

January 18th, 2019


One of the most important aspects of your job is your supervision. Great leaders make time for their workers, provide detailed feedback, and show appreciation. It’s essential for you to feel recognized in the workplace because overlooked staff members typically experience low morale and decreased performance.  If you’re feeling like your boss is not invested in you, consider some small changes to help you feel like you belong.

Make Your Mark

One way to gain respect from your supervisor is to stand out in a professional manner. Prove your worth by volunteering for assignments or even innovating your own projects when possible. The more initiative you take, the harder it becomes for your boss to overlook you. Don’t hide if you feel like your boss doesn’t see your potential: prove it to them! Contributing to the team’s success will help you feel inspired to stay on and gain appreciation from your colleagues and your supervisor.

Stay in Touch

Keeping your boss in the loop is an essential way to mitigate any doubt your employer may have. If your boss doesn’t seem invested, frequent emails about your progress are a tangible way to measure your productivity. Your boss may be ignoring you because they are concerned you’re not being efficient. Sharing updates is a positive way to connect and keep your boss in the loop. The more you communicate, the less likely it is you’ll make an error.

Have a Conversation

Even if you don’t have an ideal relationship with your supervisor, it’s necessary to sit down and discuss your contribution to the team and your overall success in your position. The best way to understand your supervisor’s motives is to ask. Plan a one-on-one meeting where you can discuss your duties and ideal career trajectory and bring up your impression that the boss isn’t invested in you. Hopefully, a productive talk can ensue where your employer can discuss changes and mitigate your concerns. If not, it’s time to look elsewhere for employment.

If you need a new position, contact SmartTalent! As a top temporary staffing agency, we can help you find the right role immediately if you’ve decided it’s time to move on. Take the guesswork out of the job search by teaming up with our staff today.

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How to Sell Yourself During a Phone Interview

January 11th, 2019


Impressing your interviewer over the phone, where you can’t make a visual impression, can be challenging for any candidate. To sell yourself over the phone, you’ll need to be cool and collected, while also appearing vivacious and enthusiastic, yet not over the top. Sometimes the phone interview can be more difficult than an in-person interview. Here’s how you can impress a potential employer during a phone screen.

Be Prepared

No matter what your expectations for this interview may be, it’s important to treat this opportunity seriously. You need to dress sharp (to inspire confidence), speak clearly and concisely, and have all necessary information promptly at hand. Cover the basics: Set aside an hour for the interview in a quiet, private location. Take time to review your resume, cover letter, and the job posting before the call. We highly recommend printing a few copies of each of these documents to spread out in front of you for quick reference. You don’t want to get stuck trying to remember what months you worked in your previous position, or what skills the posting seeks. Creating visual reminders can be helpful and even necessary, so don’t get caught unprepared.

Be Aware

Have you ever had a conversation with someone on the phone talking a mile a minute, where you can barely understand what they were saying? Don’t be this person during your phone interview. Take deep breaths when you need them and speak slowly and clearly. Running away with the conversation does not impress employers. Monitor your speed and breathing, and make sure you’re not making any thoughtless mistakes – breathing intensely into the phone, chewing gum or food.

Be the Best

Remember, the guidelines for phone interviews are similar to those of in-person interviews: be the best candidate. Prove your abilities and demonstrate the experience that will make you a perfect fit for the position. Use personal anecdotes to answer questions instead of listing your skills. They’ve seen your resume, now it’s time to make it come alive. Impress your potential new employer by confidently and thoughtfully answering questions, and the in-person interview may be just around the corner.

Are you a job seeker looking to stand out in a field of candidates? Check out SmartTalent! As a top Washington staffing agency, we can review your job application materials and find you the perfect fit fast with our staffing agency. Take a look at our resources today to learn more.

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How to Ask for a Raise

January 2nd, 2019


Requesting a raise from your supervisor can be a difficult conversation. What if they say no? What if they offer you something insulting? How can you adequately prepare for the conversation? If you’re looking for a raise, there are a few tricks and methods that can help. Here are our tips on how to ask for a raise the right way.

Keep Things Professional

There are a few ways to ask for a raise:

DO: Set a specific one-on-one meeting time with your boss

DON’T: Bring the matter up casually in a text or email

DO: Look the part – dress well and have a clean appearance

DON’T: Ask during a stressful time period

If you don’t follow these basic guidelines, you’re starting off on the wrong foot and you’re less likely to obtain the raise you’re requesting. Treat your raise request as a serious meeting, even if you have a good relationship with your supervisor.

Practice Your Pitch

Rehearse what you want to say! Write down a speech, or some bullet points on an index card, and say it out loud a few times. This can be in the mirror, to a trusted colleague or even to a family member! Tripping over words is not a good look when you’re trying to prove your credibility.

Tell a Story

If you want to convince your supervisor it’s time to up your pay, paint a picture. People like to hear descriptive examples, typically in the form of a story. Instead of claiming to improve and saying you’re a great employee, show it. Give specific examples of your experience at work. If you recently pioneered your own initiative, talk about the steps you took to implement tasks. If you’re a team player, talk about your effective method of communicating with workers. Show why you deserve to be paid more for the work you continue to do for the company.

Looking for more ways to prove yourself on the job? Check out the resources from SmartTalent! As a top Washington staffing agency, we know how to improve your abilities and help you take your talent to the next level. Take a look at our resources today to learn more.

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